Tag Archives: genre: young adult

Review: King’s Cage by Victoria Aveyard

Series: Red Queen (#3)

Release Date: 7 February, 2017

Publisher: HarperCollins (HarperTeen Imprint)

Genre: Young Adult Fiction / Fantasy / Royalty / Romance / General

ISBN:  9780062310699

Edition: Audiobook

Rating: ★★★★☆

Review Written: 10 July, 2017
Summary: In this breathless third installment to Victoria Aveyard’s bestselling Red Queen series, allegiances are tested on every side. And when the Lightning Girl’s spark is gone, who will light the way for the rebellion?

Mare Barrow is a prisoner, powerless without her lightning, tormented by her lethal mistakes. She lives at the mercy of a boy she once loved, a boy made of lies and betrayal. Now a king, Maven Calore continues weaving his dead mother’s web in an attempt to maintain control over his country—and his prisoner.

As Mare bears the weight of Silent Stone in the palace, her once-ragtag band of newbloods and Reds continue organizing, training, and expanding. They prepare for war, no longer able to linger in the shadows. And Cal, the exiled prince with his own claim on Mare’s heart, will stop at nothing to bring her back.

When blood turns on blood, and ability on ability, there may be no one left to put out the fire—leaving Norta as Mare knows it to burn all the way down.

Learn More from the HarperCollins’s Website.

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Review: Glass Sword by Victoria Aveyard

Summary:

The electrifying next installment in the Red Queen series escalates the struggle between the growing rebel army and the blood-segregated world they’ve always known—and pits Mare against the darkness that has grown in her soul.

Mare Barrow’s blood is red—the color of common folk—but her Silver ability, the power to control lightning, has turned her into a weapon that the royal court tries to control. The crown calls her an impossibility, a fake, but as she makes her escape from Maven, the prince—the friend—who betrayed her, Mare uncovers something startling: she is not the only one of her kind.

Pursued by Maven, now a vindictive king, Mare sets out to find and recruit other Red-and-Silver fighters to join in the struggle against her oppressors. But Mare finds herself on a deadly path, at risk of becoming exactly the kind of monster she is trying to defeat.Will she shatter under the weight of the lives that are the cost of rebellion? Or have treachery and betrayal hardened her forever? 

(summary pulled from Harper Collins’s Website.)

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Captive (Blackcoat Rebellion #2) by Aimée Carter

Netgalley Description:

The truth can set her free

For the past two months, Kitty Doe’s life has been a lie. Forced to impersonate Lila Hart, the Prime Minister’s niece, in a hostile meritocracy on the verge of revolution, Kitty sees her frustration grow as her trust in her fake fiancé cracks, her real boyfriend is forbidden and the Blackcoat rebels she is secretly supporting keep her in the dark more than ever.

But in the midst of discovering that her role in the Hart family may not be as coincidental as she thought, she’s accused of treason and is forced to face her greatest fear: Elsewhere. A prison where no one can escape.

As one shocking revelation leads to the next, Kitty learns the hard way that she can trust no one, not even the people she thought were on her side. With her back against the wall, Kitty wants to believe she’ll do whatever it takes to support the rebellion she believes in—but is she prepared to pay the ultimate price?

Review:

Series: Blackcoat Rebellion #2
Genre:
 Young Adult, Alternate Reality, Fantasy, Dystopian

Release Date: 25 November, 2014
Publisher: Harlequin TEEN
Purchase: Barnes & Noble • Amazon
ISBN: 9780373211289

Edition: ARC Kindle
Rating: ★★★★☆
Review Written: 15 January, 2014

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Review: Princess of Thorns by Stacey Jay

Game of Thrones meets the Grimm’s fairy tales in this twisted, fast-paced romantic fantasy-adventure about Sleeping Beauty’s daughter, a warrior princess who must fight to reclaim her throne.
 
Though she looks like a mere mortal, Princess Aurora is a fairy blessed with enhanced strength, bravery, and mercy yet cursed to destroy the free will of any male who kisses her. Disguised as a boy, she enlists the help of the handsome but also cursed Prince Niklaas to fight legions of evil and free her brother from the ogre queen who stole Aurora’s throne ten years ago.
 
Will Aurora triumph over evil and reach her brother before it’s too late? Can Aurora and Niklaas break the curses that will otherwise forever keep them from finding their one true love?

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Review: Waistcoats & Weaponry (Finishing School #3) by Gail Carriger

Waistcoats & Weaponry (Finishing School Series #3)

Class is back in session…

Sophronia continues her second year at finishing school in style–with a steel-bladed fan secreted in the folds of her ball gown, of course. Such a fashionable choice of weapon comes in handy when Sophronia, her best friend Dimity, sweet sootie Soap, and the charming Lord Felix Mersey stowaway on a train to return their classmate Sidheag to her werewolf pack in Scotland. No one suspected what–or who–they would find aboard that suspiciously empty train. Sophronia uncovers a plot that threatens to throw all of London into chaos and she must decide where her loyalties lie, once and for all.

Gather your poison, steel tipped quill, and the rest of your school supplies and join Mademoiselle Geraldine’s proper young killing machines in the third rousing installment in theNew York Times bestselling Finishing School Series by steampunk author, Gail Carriger. (Gail Carriger’s Website)

Series: Finishing School #3
Genre:
 Alternate History, Steampunk, Young Adult

Release Date: 4 November, 2014
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Purchase: barnes & noble
ISBN: 9780316279611

Edition: eBook
Rating: ★★★★★
Review Written: 25 September, 2014

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Review: Curtsies & Conspiracies (Finishing School #2) by Gail Carriger

curtsies

Does one need four fully grown foxgloves for decorating a dinner table for six guests? Or is it six foxgloves to kill four fully grown guests?

Sophronia’s first year at Mademoiselle Geraldine’s Finishing Academy for Young Ladies of Quality has certainly been rousing! For one thing, finishing school is training her to be a spy–won’t Mumsy be surprised? Furthermore, Sophronia got mixed up in an intrigue over a stolen device and had a cheese pie thrown at her in a most horrid display of poor manners.

Now, as she sneaks around the dirigible school, eavesdropping on the teachers’ quarters and making clandestine climbs to the ship’s boiler room, she learns that there may be more to a field trip to London than is apparent at first. A conspiracy is afoot–one with dire implications for both supernaturals and humans. Sophronia must rely on her training to discover who is behind the dangerous plot-and survive the London Season with a full dance card.

In this sequel to New York Times bestselling Etiquette & Espionage, class is back in session with more petticoats and poison, tea trays and treason. Gail’s distinctive voice, signature humor, and lush steampunk setting are sure to be the height of fashion this season. (Gail Carriger’s Website)

Series: Finishing School #2
Genre:
 Alternate History, Steampunk, Young Adult

Release Date: 5 November, 2013
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Purchase: barnes & noble
ISBN:  9780316190206

Edition: eBook
Rating: ★★★★★
Review Written: 24 September, 2014

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Lions, Tigers, and Banned Books, Oh my! Top 5 Banned Books Picks

 
Banned Books Week is not a new invention. Launched in 1982 as a response to a surge of challenges to titles in libraries, schools, and bookshops – Banned Books Week has developed into an annual event to educate students and celebrate our freedom to read. I can’t list out all the books that are challenged or banned on my blog (it’d take too long), but you can check out the top 10 books from 2001-2013 here.
 
Without further ado, here are my Top 5 Banned Books containing both single books and series.
 
#5 – The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins
Reasons for challenges: Religious Overtones and unsuited for age group.
 
Taken as part of the highly popular Dystopian future setting, The Hunger Games focuses on the story of Katniss Everdeen, a young woman in a desolate version of what once was America, renamed Panem. Throughout the series, the reader’s swept along with some of Katniss’s very questionable choices, challenges of what a Utopian society looks like from the lower levels of society, and presents the idea of children killing children. It’s a story of growth and how happy endings aren’t always easy, definitely a good read.
 
#4 The Giver by Lois Lowry
Reason for challenge:  violent and sexual scenes, infanticide, euthanasia, and “sexual awakening.”
 
Perhaps one of the most well known Utopian/Dystopian novels around, The Giver introduces readers to the world where everything is ‘the same’. There’s no colours, no music, everything is regulated by the government. At the age of twelve you’re given your life assignment and set to train for it, the very young and very old are ‘sent elsewhere’ to spare the needs of the community. It’s not a very happy place, but emotions aren’t exactly there to know any different. It’s a challenging book, making the readers question everything about the books and one of perhaps the most influential things I read from the time I was in middle school onward.


#3 His Dark Materials Trilogy by Philip Pullman
Reasons: political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, and violence
 
The world where the His Dark Materials trilogy takes place is a parallel world to our own, though with the key addition of Dæmons – a physical form of one’s conscience. Originally Published as Northern Lights in Europe, the first book introduces readers to Lyra, a rebellious child left in the care of scholars while her parents go gallivanting around on their own thing. Mostly wild, Lyra seems to have a knack for getting herself into trouble. The series gets darker as it goes along, pulling in elements from this world and that, but don’t let that stop you from reading it. This series is one of my favorites, set up as a fantasy world and I’ll admit, I’ve always wondered what form my dæmon would have settled on.
 


#2  Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Reasons: Occultism/Satanism, offensive language, disrespect to adults, violence, and ‘intense fantasy’

A fantastic tale of childhood imagination, the Bridge to Terabithia focuses on the friendship of Jess Aarons and Leslie Burke, two children who are a little off the beaten path of life. They create a vivid fantasy life outside of school to deal with many of their childhood fears and issues. However when a tragedy strikes, make sure you have tissues to deal with the fall out of things that happen. I love this book, and yes, it does make me cry every time I read it.
#1 Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling
Reasons: Occultism, Witchcraft, Violence, Anti-Family, Satanism
The story that built a generation, and yes I’m very much part of that generation. Undoubtedly one of the biggest hits in the past 30 years, Harry Potter is the incredibly coming of age story of a boy who comes from a impossible family life to becoming a man of his own making. Captivated in seven books and several not quite direct spin-offs, Harry Potter teaches the meaning of friendship, shows hardship, and even gives a bit of a historical lesson (if one squints and tries to read more in the lines). Definitely one of my favorite series to reread over and over.