Tag Archives: genre: fantasy

Review: King’s Cage by Victoria Aveyard

Series: Red Queen (#3)

Release Date: 7 February, 2017

Publisher: HarperCollins (HarperTeen Imprint)

Genre: Young Adult Fiction / Fantasy / Royalty / Romance / General

ISBN:  9780062310699

Edition: Audiobook

Rating: ★★★★☆

Review Written: 10 July, 2017
Summary: In this breathless third installment to Victoria Aveyard’s bestselling Red Queen series, allegiances are tested on every side. And when the Lightning Girl’s spark is gone, who will light the way for the rebellion?

Mare Barrow is a prisoner, powerless without her lightning, tormented by her lethal mistakes. She lives at the mercy of a boy she once loved, a boy made of lies and betrayal. Now a king, Maven Calore continues weaving his dead mother’s web in an attempt to maintain control over his country—and his prisoner.

As Mare bears the weight of Silent Stone in the palace, her once-ragtag band of newbloods and Reds continue organizing, training, and expanding. They prepare for war, no longer able to linger in the shadows. And Cal, the exiled prince with his own claim on Mare’s heart, will stop at nothing to bring her back.

When blood turns on blood, and ability on ability, there may be no one left to put out the fire—leaving Norta as Mare knows it to burn all the way down.

Learn More from the HarperCollins’s Website.

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Book Tour: The Girl Who Came Back to Life by Craig Staufenberg

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“When you die, your spirit wakes in the north, in the City of the Dead. There, you wander the cold until one of your living loved ones finds you, says “Goodbye,” and Sends you to the next world.

After her parents die, 12-year-old Sophie refuses to release their spirits. Instead, she resolves to travel to the City of the Dead to bring her mother and father’s spirits back home with her.

Taking the long pilgrimage north with her gruff & distant grandmother—by train, by foot, by boat; over ruined mountains and plains and oceans—Sophie struggles to return what death stole from her. Yet the journey offers her many hard, unexpected lessons—what to hold on to, when to let go, and who she must truly bring back to life.”

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Review: Princess of Thorns by Stacey Jay

Game of Thrones meets the Grimm’s fairy tales in this twisted, fast-paced romantic fantasy-adventure about Sleeping Beauty’s daughter, a warrior princess who must fight to reclaim her throne.
 
Though she looks like a mere mortal, Princess Aurora is a fairy blessed with enhanced strength, bravery, and mercy yet cursed to destroy the free will of any male who kisses her. Disguised as a boy, she enlists the help of the handsome but also cursed Prince Niklaas to fight legions of evil and free her brother from the ogre queen who stole Aurora’s throne ten years ago.
 
Will Aurora triumph over evil and reach her brother before it’s too late? Can Aurora and Niklaas break the curses that will otherwise forever keep them from finding their one true love?

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Lions, Tigers, and Banned Books, Oh my! Top 5 Banned Books Picks

 
Banned Books Week is not a new invention. Launched in 1982 as a response to a surge of challenges to titles in libraries, schools, and bookshops – Banned Books Week has developed into an annual event to educate students and celebrate our freedom to read. I can’t list out all the books that are challenged or banned on my blog (it’d take too long), but you can check out the top 10 books from 2001-2013 here.
 
Without further ado, here are my Top 5 Banned Books containing both single books and series.
 
#5 – The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins
Reasons for challenges: Religious Overtones and unsuited for age group.
 
Taken as part of the highly popular Dystopian future setting, The Hunger Games focuses on the story of Katniss Everdeen, a young woman in a desolate version of what once was America, renamed Panem. Throughout the series, the reader’s swept along with some of Katniss’s very questionable choices, challenges of what a Utopian society looks like from the lower levels of society, and presents the idea of children killing children. It’s a story of growth and how happy endings aren’t always easy, definitely a good read.
 
#4 The Giver by Lois Lowry
Reason for challenge:  violent and sexual scenes, infanticide, euthanasia, and “sexual awakening.”
 
Perhaps one of the most well known Utopian/Dystopian novels around, The Giver introduces readers to the world where everything is ‘the same’. There’s no colours, no music, everything is regulated by the government. At the age of twelve you’re given your life assignment and set to train for it, the very young and very old are ‘sent elsewhere’ to spare the needs of the community. It’s not a very happy place, but emotions aren’t exactly there to know any different. It’s a challenging book, making the readers question everything about the books and one of perhaps the most influential things I read from the time I was in middle school onward.


#3 His Dark Materials Trilogy by Philip Pullman
Reasons: political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, and violence
 
The world where the His Dark Materials trilogy takes place is a parallel world to our own, though with the key addition of Dæmons – a physical form of one’s conscience. Originally Published as Northern Lights in Europe, the first book introduces readers to Lyra, a rebellious child left in the care of scholars while her parents go gallivanting around on their own thing. Mostly wild, Lyra seems to have a knack for getting herself into trouble. The series gets darker as it goes along, pulling in elements from this world and that, but don’t let that stop you from reading it. This series is one of my favorites, set up as a fantasy world and I’ll admit, I’ve always wondered what form my dæmon would have settled on.
 


#2  Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Reasons: Occultism/Satanism, offensive language, disrespect to adults, violence, and ‘intense fantasy’

A fantastic tale of childhood imagination, the Bridge to Terabithia focuses on the friendship of Jess Aarons and Leslie Burke, two children who are a little off the beaten path of life. They create a vivid fantasy life outside of school to deal with many of their childhood fears and issues. However when a tragedy strikes, make sure you have tissues to deal with the fall out of things that happen. I love this book, and yes, it does make me cry every time I read it.
#1 Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling
Reasons: Occultism, Witchcraft, Violence, Anti-Family, Satanism
The story that built a generation, and yes I’m very much part of that generation. Undoubtedly one of the biggest hits in the past 30 years, Harry Potter is the incredibly coming of age story of a boy who comes from a impossible family life to becoming a man of his own making. Captivated in seven books and several not quite direct spin-offs, Harry Potter teaches the meaning of friendship, shows hardship, and even gives a bit of a historical lesson (if one squints and tries to read more in the lines). Definitely one of my favorite series to reread over and over.

Cover Reveal: To Make a Witch by Heather Hamilton Senter

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BOOK & AUTHOR INFO:
To Make a Witch by Heather Hamilton-Senter
(Sword of Elements #1.5)
Publication date: October 1st 2014
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult

Synopsis:
At her old school, Lacey found herself on the wrong side of a conflict between Celtic gods. Making a new start in an exclusive boarding school in New Orleans, she hopes to forget that she was once on the verge of becoming a powerful witch—and everything she has lost since then.

When a gruesome murder occurs in the very heart of Westover Academy, Lacey senses a connection between it and the desecration of the tomb of Marie Laveau, the Voodoo queen. Haunted by a trauma in her past and the resulting OCD, Lacey must solve the mystery before she becomes the killer’s next target.

Circumstances beyond her control may once again make Lacey McInnis—cheerleader, scholar, and all-around good girl—a witch.

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23157847-to-make-a-witch

AUTHOR BIO:

Heather grew up in a family where books of myth and legend were used to teach the ABCs and Irish uncles still believed in fairies. Raised with tall tales, she has always told stories too- first as an actor and singer, then as a photographer, and now as a writer.

Heather lives in rural Ontario, Canada happily raising three children ranging in age from 6 to 18 with her biggest fan, her husband Steve.

Author links:


Review: Grave Mercy by Robin LaFevers

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Summary:

Why be the sheep, when you can be the wolf?

Seventeen-year-old Ismae escapes from the brutality of an arranged marriage into the sanctuary of the convent of St. Mortain, where the sisters still serve the gods of old. Here she learns that the god of Death Himself has blessed her with dangerous gifts—and a violent destiny. If she chooses to stay at the convent, she will be trained as an assassin and serve as a handmaiden to Death. To claim her new life, she must destroy the lives of others.

Ismae’s most important assignment takes her straight into the high court of Brittany—where she finds herself woefully under prepared—not only for the deadly games of intrigue and treason, but for the impossible choices she must make. For how can she deliver Death’s vengeance upon a target who, against her will, has stolen her heart?

Series: His Fair Assassin #1
Genre: Young Adult/Fantasy
Release Date: 3 April, 2012
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Books
Purchase: Amazon
ISBN: 9780547628349
Edition: eBook
Rating: ★★★★★
Review Written: 21 August, 2014

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